Dec 5, 2011 - Books.Books.Books.    No Comments

Ten reasons why…YOU SHOULD GET BACK TO WRITING (December)

We all have those ‘breaks’ where we stop writing and do other things much more interesting. Well, I am telling you now, it is time to get off the couch and WRITE. During December we have a bunch of distractions. So here are ten reasons why you should keep writing.

1) Santa will be very mad if you don’t write and put you on the Naughty list.
2) Facebook and Twitter are going to miss you posting about your upcoming book.
3) Your Characters will get lonely.
4) Your hand will freeze up and you have to work even harder to write.
5) Your Characters will get bored.
6) The world needs a new story.
7) Your ‘break’ will be boring if you don’t write. 8) You will lose your amazing ideas
9) People will begin to stalk you
10) You just need to write. Just write.

Please feel free to comment other ideas why we should get back into writing!

Nov 23, 2011 - Book Interviews    No Comments

Interview with Lauren Oliver

Question 1: What are the books you wrote?
I’ve so far published three books: Before I Fall, Delirium, and Liesl and Po. The second book in my Delirium trilogy, Pandemonium, will be released in March 2012.
Question 2: What inspired you to write your first book?
I think a lot of different things inspired the book, actually. First of all, I’ve always thought about what my perfect day would be: a day I could relive over and over and still be perfectly happy. When I was younger it used to be a kind of game of mine, when I couldn’t fall asleep, to try and imagine a moment or event or day of perfect happiness in as much detail as possible.
This is an issue Sam addresses in the book, as she relives her last day over and over.
Additionally, right as I was starting to think about the book I was put in touch with a guy I’d “known,” essentially, my whole life; we’d gone to elementary, middle, and high school together. I put “known” in quotation marks because what occurred to me once I started talking to him in my adult life was how little the impressions I’d always had of him—impressions formed from years of reported gossip, or vague prejudices, or whatever it is the mechanism is by which we feel we know people in high school without actually speaking to them—had been one hundred percent wrong. He was literally the opposite of the person I had always thought him to be.
This got me thinking about a girl who would have the chance to cycle deeper and deeper into the minutiae of her everyday experiences, and thus begin to see them in a different manner.
Question 3:  Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their books?
I have so many favorites; it’s impossible to pick. I love authors who blend realism with the fantastical, from CS Lewis and Roald Dahl to Jeffrey Eugenides and Gabriel Garcia Marquez.
Question 4: If you could pick any book to write, (it doesn’t have to be yours) what book would it be?
Harry Potter, of course—both for creative and financial reasons.
Question 5: When you are alone, what is the one thing you do?
Stay in my pajamas!
Question 6: If you had 10 Million Dollars, what would you do with it? Why?
I would pay half of it to taxes (because that’s patriotic!), and then I would buy a big farmhouse for my friends and family to use as a retreat, as well as a cozy apartment in Paris. I love to travel, and I find myself inspired by different places. Hopefully I’d have money left over, which I would save for my retirement.
Question 7: If you couldn’t bean author what would your ideal job be?
A back-up dancer for Beyonce!! Or a food writer…which I guess is kind of like being an author.
Question 8: What is the hardest part in writing a book?
The hardest part is simply sticking with it, sentence after sentence, page after page. It requires patience and a whole lot of discipline. It can be kind of agonizing to make a book live, to make the characters lift off the page and begin acting on their own.
Question 9: Tell me a bit about your childhood. Where did you grow up? What were your dreams back then?
I grew up primarily in a suburb outside of New York City. My parents are both creative people who hugely valued the arts; our home was filled with art, music, and tons and tons of books. As a child, I wanted to be a ballet dancer, but I also spent plenty of time penning stories, drawing, and imagining my way into different places.
Question 10: Do you have any advice for aspiring authors?
Write!! Write every day, and read as much as you can. That’s really the only training that is necessary.
–Lauren :)
Thank you so much Lauren for your time!
We all love your books!!
~Imabookie
Nov 7, 2011 - Book Interviews    1 Comment

Interview with Shelly Crane!

  • Question One:  What books have you written?
-I have 6 published works. Significance, Accordance, Collide, Uprising, Stealing Grace and Devour (Which technically comes out November. 
  •  Question Two: Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
- That the people in your life, family and loved ones, are the only thing that matters and it’s important to have respect  for them. Selfishness is cruel.
  • Question Three: Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?
      – Not yet, but I have a couple book signings lined up next year.

  • Question Four:  Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?
- Placing my characters in harmful situations. It hurts me to write those scenes :)
  • Question Five:  What are your current projects?
- The 3rd book in 2 of my series. Catalyst and Defiance.
  • Question Six:  Do you have a specific writing style?
- Not really. I just wing it.
  • Question Seven: Who is your publisher? How did you pick your publisher?
-After careful consideration, I decided to self publish.
  • Question Eight:  Do you use your OWN experiences in your writings?
-Sometimes but I try not to. it can get messy.
  • Question Nine:  Did you think you’d ever become an author?
- Absolutely not. I didn’t even like to read until about a year before I wrote my first book, Collide.
  • Question Ten: Who or what inspired you to write?
- My own need to read books that appeal to me and my need for absolute true love is what got me started. I couldn’t find
any books that weren’t about love triangles so I wrote my own :)
Thank you so much Shelly!
Nov 6, 2011 - Books.Books.Books.    No Comments

Review for Learning In the Dark by Margaret Sarah Bechtel

LEARNING IN THE DARK BY MARGARET SARAH BECHTEL IS ABOUT LYNN MOORE, WHO BECOMES BLIND FROM A MAJOR ACCIDENT AT THE AGE OF TEN.  LYNN FINDS HERSELF 12 YEARS LATER IN THE PRESENTS OF THE TWO MEN WHO BLINDED HER. LYNN STRUGGLES IN FORGIVING THESE MEN, THE QUESTION THROUGHOUT THE BOOK IS CAN LYNN LEARN TO FORGIVE?

WHEN I BEGAN THIS BOOK THE MAIN CHARACTER, LYNN, REALLY GRABBED ME. IN SOME WAYS I COULD RELATETO HER, I COULD REALLY PUT MYSELF IN HER SHOES AND FEEL WHAT SHE WAS FEELING.

LYNN GOES THROUGH ALOT IN THE BOOK. IN THE END, I DIDN’T FEEL BAD FOR HER. IF YOU WOUD LIKE TO KNOW WHY, READ THE BOOK!(:

I COULD ALSO PICTURE PERFECTLY IN MY MIND THE WHOLE SCENE OF LYNN’S BLINDING. MARGARET SARAH BACHTEL HAS A REAL TALENT FOR WRITING.

I RECOMMEND THIS BOOK TO EVERYONE, EVEN THOSE WHO HAVE A HARD TIME FORGIVING. THIS BOOK HAS A LITTLE BIT OF EVERYTHING. I REALLY ENJOY THE WAY MARGARET WRITES.

IT IS A WONDERFUL BOOK!

Nov 6, 2011 - Book Interviews    No Comments

Interview with Veronica Blade

1) How many books have you written?
  • Six full length novels, plus 2 novellas. Something Witchy This Way Comes is my 5th novel. My first two… well, let’s just say I was still learning my craft at the time. They may never make it out of my closet!

2) Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

  • I learned that writing a novel is the easy part! Making it great is quite another thing. Selling it is even harder. But the most important thing I learned is that just because your friends and family are impressed with your first effort doesn’t mean the rest of the world will be. As they say, if it was easy, everyone would be doing it. Take your time with your novel, make it shine. Resist submitting it to agents or editors until you’ve received enthusiastic feedback from contests judges or people you’ve never met.

3) Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

  • I’m a homebody. I like being around all my stuff. I tend to write about places I already know, much to my hubby’s disappointment. Unlike me, he loves to travel.

4) Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

  • Yes! Filling in all the plot holes. It’s so easy to write the story and forget to transfer everything from your head and into the story. And since I see everything so clearly in my head, I don’t always think to put down all the details. I depend heavily on my beta readers to tell me what I’m missing.

5) What are your current projects?

  • I have A Bite’s Tale: A Furry Fable coming out later this month. It’s a novella with a Cinderella spin, but with vampires and werewolves. In December, I have the prequel to my shape shifter series. It’s a novella called Thrown to the Wolves. The first book in that shape shifter series, My Wolf’s Bane, is a full length novel releasing in January 2012.

6) Do you have a specific writing style?

  • I don’t do dystopia or anything that could ever qualify as dark. Light on the world-building, heavy on the romance. Maybe a dash of humor, and I will definitely torture my characters, but always a happy ending. It’s just the way I roll.

7) Who is your publisher? How did you pick your publisher?

  • After over 160 agent rejections (with my earlier manuscripts), I knew that without an agent, I’d have difficulty selling to one of the larger publishers. Once Something Witchy This Way Comes began placing in contests, I lost the urge to make the big guys happy. I went with Crush Publishing, because I felt it would be a more personal experience and I’d have more input with covers, titles, etc. Plus, a smaller press can get a book published faster than the big houses.

8) Do you use your OWN experiences in your writings?

  • Absolutely! Keep in mind that my novels have a lot of romance. My stories are about relationships and happy endings. I think that the reason Something Witchy This Way Comes resonates with readers is because it’s real. Ok, the witches aren’t real, but the feelings and thoughts are. A writer can’t write about emotions if he/she has no clue what they’re about. Life becomes real when you experience it, whether it’s yourself experiencing it or someone you know.

9) Did you ever think you’d ever become an author?

  • Not in a million years. I’d always wanted to write, but I never thought I’d come up with anything worth writing about. About 4 years ago, I came up with that magical idea. Well, I thought so at the time anyway. Turns out, not so much. But during the journey, me and my keyboard really hit it off and I’ve been a sucker for vampires, werewolves and witches ever since.

10) Who or what inspired you to write?

  • Lots of authors, but probably mostly Nora Roberts and Anne Rice. But I had never dipped my toe in the young adult genre — not even reading as a teen — until I read Twilight. That was when I fell in love. I’ve dabbled in grown up stories since then, but I think the majority of my creativity will be with seventeen year old characters. It’s my mental age, so why not?
Nov 1, 2011 - Book Interviews    No Comments

Interview with Melisse Aires!


  • Question One: What are the books you wrote?
I’ve been e-pubbed with several publishers over the years. Right now I have a steampunk/spacewestern romance series with Whiskey Creek Press Torrid, title: The Starlander Frontier: Starlander’s Myth, released Nov 1. In April I have a sci fi romance called Refugees on Urloon coming from Lyrical Press. Both are novellas in the 35k range.
  • Question Two: What inspired you to write your first book.
I’ve always written stories. As a child I was a huge book worm(still am) and scribbled all types of stories. As an adult I wrote several stories for children and Ellery Queen Mystery mag, got lots of rejections. The I took a break and wrote some fanfic for awhile. By then e-publishers started buying romances of all types and lengths so I started submitting.
  • Question Three: Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their books?
I have several favorite authors! I like Julia Quinn, a regency romance writer. Her characters have depth and her books run the emotional gambit from funny to tear jerking.
  • Question Four: If you could pick any book to write, (it doesn’t have to be your own) what book would it be? 
I think George Orwell’s Animal Farm is something everyone should read and understand, an important book.
  • Question Five: When you are alone, what is the one thing you do?
I make a pot of coffee and snuggle up with a book or computer and my little dog Baxter. But I am rarely alone!
  • Question Six: If you had 10 Million Dollars, what would you do with it? Why?
Very ordinary stuff–buy a nice house near my sister, help relatives out. Visit my dear friend in UK. Donate to food banks.

I’m pretty much a quiet homebody and prefer to be home with family. Not very glamorous, I know.
  • Question Seven: If you couldn’t be an author what would your ideal job be?
I like computers, so a computer job would be great. But I figure I can always be a writer, even if no one contracts my books.
  • Question Eight: What is the hardest part in writing a book?
Submission.
  • Question Nine: Tell me a bit about your childhod. Where did you grow up? What were your dreams back then?
I grew up in Billings, Montana, but wanted to live in Narnia. I have two brothers and one sister, we all went to Catholic school and spent vacations camping in Montana and Wyoming. When we went camping we took books to read.I always knew I wanted to marry and have kids, dogs, cats, guinea pigs etc. My parents were very college oriented so I also knew I would be off to college. I loved Story, WY, and wanted to live up there in the mountains. Or maybe some other mountains–but mountains were part of the picture!
  • Question Ten: Do you have any advice for aspiring authors?
Finish stories and submit them! Hang out on online writing sites that give info about the industry. Don’t give up.
Thank you so much Melisse!!
Oct 28, 2011 - Writings    No Comments

Poem – Be Strong

I am here when they are there,

all huddled together like one.

They laugh and stare, I swear.

It is clear they have won.

I sit here alone, in this dusty old corner

as they make another joke

as alike as I am, I still feel like a foreigner

once again, they take another poke

“Dont look at me Loser!” They mock

my heart breaks at every insult

“Chicken Stock!”

My heart cracks again, this is the result

I’ve had enough

I am done.

I stand up, acting all tough.

This time, I am the one whose won.

Oct 28, 2011 - Book Interviews    1 Comment

Interview with Addison Moore!

Question 1: What are the books you wrote?
  • First, thank you SO much for having me! I’m thrilled to be here! =) I love writing. I write young adult paranormal romance books and my first series is the Celestra series, which so far include; ETHEREAL, TREMBLE, BURN, WICKED, VEX (coming soon;)
Question 2: What inspired you to write your first book?
  • Honestly, I have something in me that burns to write. I think most writers know what I’m talking about. I think I was just hardwired to do this. And, I absolutely love it!
Question 3:  Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their books?
  • I always say The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath. I think not only is it a classic but it showcases a very clever writing style. I so wish I could write like that! There’s something about the prose that just speak to me and on top of that it has a great story.
Question 4: If you could pick any book to write, (it doesn’t have to be yours) what book would it be?
  • I would love to write something epic that garners a wide audience, and has both dramatic and comedic appeal. I also think it would be fun to do a retelling of the classic fairytales.

Question 5: When you are alone, what is the one thing you do?
  • Truthfully, write. I also read a ton. Is that boring? I sort of think it rocks.
Question 6: If you had 10 Million Dollars, what would you do with it? Why?
  • I would make sure my kids had enough to go to college with a small nest egg for myself, then I would donate a bunch to select charities.
Question 7: If you couldn’t be an author what would your ideal job be?
  • Gah! Blasphemy. I could never not write. But if I had to choose another ideal job it would be a book reviewer for the New York Times.

Question 8: What is the hardest part in writing a book?
  • The actual part of getting my fingers on the keyboard—no, really. It’s a lot of fun to plan and outline a book, or a series, but sitting down and pumping out words has got to be the grunt work.
Question 9: Tell me a bit about your childhood. Where did you grow up? What were your dreams back then?
  • I grew up in L.A., and even as a young child my favorite place was always the library. One of my best summers was the year all my friends went away on vacation, and I was stuck at home with a stack of library books. I felt like I lived a million adventures that summer. It was also the year I discovered young adult fiction.

Question 10: Do you have any advice for aspiring authors?
  • Read. Read, read, read, read. It teaches you the rhythm of a book, and shows the bones of plot structure. Read in your genre, read books on the writing craft, and most of all write everyday. Even if it’s just a sentence, you need to get used to pulling words out of your brain. Writing is the best form of therapy and relaxation.
Thank You Addison!
Addison Moore
Author of the Celestra Series
AddisonMoorewrites@yahoo.com
http://addisonmoorewrites.blogspot.com/
Oct 27, 2011 - Book Interviews    No Comments

Interview with Theresa Oliver

Question 1: What are the books you wrote?

  • The books I have written are “Cambria,” which is set for publication in 2012. I have also been offered a contract for two other Cambria books, for a total of three in the series. The second book is “Cambria: The Return of Seth,” and the third is “Cambria: The Journey Home.” I am also currently working on three other books: “Star,” “Wolf Girl and the Children of the Moon,” and “Thou Shalt Not Kill.” In addition, my short story “The Door,” is included in the Firefly and Wisp Publishing paranormal anthology, “13 Tales of the Paranormal,” Which is currently available at Amazon.com, Smashwords, and Barnes and Noble. It is available on both e-book and paperback.

Question 2: What inspired you to write your first book?

  • My oldest son is not an avid reader and, at the time, there were no books out there that interested him. I originally wrote Cambria for my oldest son, Travis, in an effort to encourage him to read more, and to encourage other students to read, as well. My main character, Seth Roberts, is loosely based on my son Travis.

Question 3:  Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their books?

  • My favorite author is Stephenie Meyers, hands down! I knew I wanted to write, but wasn’t sure which genre, until I read the Twilight series by Stephenie Meyer. Reading her books introduced me to Young Adult books. After reading her books, I knew that I wanted to write for young adults. Her books grab you from the beginning and won’t let you go until the final pages! Then, they leave you wanting even more!

Question 4: If you could pick any book to write, (it doesn’t have to be yours) what book would it be?

  • I can’t wait to write the second and third books in my Cambria series. Also, I really want to finish my other three books, as well: “Star,” “Wolf Girl and the Children of the Moon,” and “Thou Shalt Not Kill.”

Question 5: When you are alone, what is the one thing you do?

  • Currently, when I am alone, I write. I really don’t have a lot of down time now, so I love to spend it with my children and write. But when I am alone, I write, write, and write some more!

Question 6: If you had 10 Million Dollars, what would you do with it? Why?

  • If I had 10 Million dollars, I would first pay off my student loans, then I would pay off my other bills to be completely debt free. Then I would buy my son and my husband new cars, then one for myself. Then, I would set money aside for all three of my children for college, and I would buy a house. Also, if I could do it, I would install a playground for the older elementary students at my school, and I would pay off my church’s debt. (I have thought about this extensively! You can’t tell, can you?)

Question 7: If you couldn’t be an author what would your ideal job be?

  • If I couldn’t be an author, I would do what I’m doing now: teach children. I love teaching students, especially watching the light go on within their minds when they “get it.” It is a feeling that is priceless! If children can read and write, they can do anything, but they need a good foundation to help them succeed. And giving students that foundation is a privilege that I am very fortunate to be entrusted with.

Question 8: What is the hardest part in writing a book?

  • The hardest part of writing a book is coming up with the idea. When you start writing, the rest comes to you. I always know basically what will happen in my books, but the “unexpected surprises” that happens when you’re writing is what is fantastic and keeps me writing! Often times, I know what will happen in my books, but not exactly how or what path my characters will take to get there. But while I am writing, then it all becomes very clear. That creativity of writing is what I crave and what keeps me writing!

Question 9: Tell me a bit about your childhood. Where did you grow up? What were your dreams back then?

  • I grew up in Southern Indiana. I went to Our Lady of Providence High School, a Catholic high school, where I fell in love with writing. In high school, I wrote my first short story “The Door,” which I revamped and just recently publishing in Firefly and Wisp Publishing’s paranormal anthology, “13 Tales of the Paranormal.” In high school, I wrote everything I could think of, which included, shot stories, poetry, letters, just about anything. Then one of my teachers, Ms. Burke, took me aside one day and told me I should be a writer. Ever since, I knew I would be a writer one day, even though life has taken a few turns in the process. I also wanted to be a singer, as well. Later in life, I was in a band and sang professionally for a short time.

Question 10: Do you have any advice for aspiring authors?

  • Yes! Absolutely! First, write every day! The way you get better at anything is to practice. Well, the same holds true for writing. Also, put your work out there for positive feedback! Getting my work out there for others to read has helped me to step up my game in a big way. It is very encouraging and you meet lots of great people in the process. Next, find a supportive writing community and become a part of it! There are many writers out there that are more than willing to help out aspiring writers. Next, take some classes, even a workshop type class. In fact, those are great! I recommend the writing program “Writing for Children and Teenagers,” an online course through the Institute of Children’s Literature. It is an online course within which you work one-on-one with an editor. As a result, you receive personalized help and feedback for your writing needs. Again, this helps you step up your game and learn how to write. Lastly, be open to accept friendly, positive criticism. Authors who have been there know a thing or two about writing, so be open to their advice. And most writers will not give advice unless you ask for it. But if you ask, then listen and utilize their expertise! Next, don’t be afraid to throw out chapters, revamp, and rewrite. I once had to omit five chapters of a book to tighten the work and make it better. I was very happy with the results, and it turned into a work I could be proud of. Lastly, be sure to submit your work to publishers! And if you get a rejection notice, then you are in good company. John Grisham was turned down by 14 literary agents before he finally found one that would take a chance on him. Now look where he is today. If you get a rejection, then know you are in good company! Brush yourself off, and send it out again! It only takes one to say yes! Happy writing!
Thank You so much Theresa!
Here is Theresa’s contact info:
Once again, thank you!
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